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September 19, 2006

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Kelvin Quee

Garr, as usual, you have done it again! You are simply the thought-leader in presentations. Always at the forefront and bleeding edge.

Presenters ought to use more pictures, diagrams and, when possible, videos/animations. Yet, not everybody is technically savvy or artistically inclined enough to produce animations/videos.

Still, there's not excuse for not being able to draw diagrams or find interesting pictures. Flickr has an "Interesting"-measure, so you should be able to find relevant pictures to keep your audience from dozing off.

And, everyone comfortable with a mouse, should always try to reduce lengthy bullet points and multiple slides into single diagram.

I've had great success in doing the above, though sometimes audiences get a little confused/disorientated because it's so unexpected. So, remember to keep an eye on your audience when doing the "unexpected". Measure their anxiety and if they are too uncomfortable, skip them. Else, if they look like they are up for some challenge, get them into it. Audiences will thank you for paying attention to them.

Remember that not everyone is ready for pictures and diagrams, though, videos are always the exception.

What do the rest of you think?

john trenouth

"What do the rest of you think?"

I think the claim that people who draw well are good designers betrays a profound and complete misunderstanding of design.


Garr

Certainly knowing how to draw well does not make one a good designer. That would be a silly claim for myriad reasons. Many people can draw perfectly well and not know the first thing about design. Many great designers can not draw very well. I think what Mark Kennedy was saying is that at the highest levels, good illustrators, storyboard artists, etc. have a good understanding of design.

My point in brining up the whole drawing and comics thing is that it is just another area to delve into to work on our own visual literacy. I do not think Mark or anyone was saying "people who draw well are *necessarily* good designers." I personally do not think good drawing equals good design, but does a good understanding of design help make for a better illustrator? Design study, design education, design practice probably makes us a better anything. For most lay people, design is on the surface, it's often no more than decoration...

-G

Chris

Without the explanation I actually misunderstood your comic (I blame lack of context).

The message looked like: If you say you're great, then wait, you'll create a buzz. To which I thought, "Rubbish."

Maybe instead of 1, 2, 3, 4; the images should be 1, 2, 1, 2.

Ebutube

Great tips on PowerPoint and presentations in general. Humor can communicate concisely and effectively! A good story has the power to capture our emotions, visual cues, and wake up an audience. Thanks for the organized ideas

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